If you want to grab the tiger by his tail, you had better have a plan for his teeth.

We've all been given the orders to have our students succeed on the English II EOC. This site is our plan for dealing with the teeth of this beast. Please feel free to shoot me possible additions to this site. The more we work together, the more prepared we are.


KNOW YOUR ENEMY

The test:

  • has seven passages (1 poem, 4 informational, two fictional)
  • has an average passage length of five pages
  • will have 45 multiple choice, 3 constructed response, and 5 technology enhanced questions
  • is completely online
  • some of the multiple choice questions are discrete items (meaning they do not directly relate to the text)

 

From a Test Question Writer

Here are some guidelines that the test question writers had to keep in mind when making the test. Use this as a guide when making your own practice questions.

  • There should not be questions framed in negatives or "everything except".
  • Theme and main idea questions will not focus on one main idea or theme, alone.
  • All questions rigidly adhere to common core standards-- down to the specific skill. If there was an English standard about sequencing and the order of events in a story, we wrote questions for it. If there was a standard identifying multiple themes, we wrote a question for it. The subcategories for the common core standards as they applied to reading fiction and informational texts determined every test item we wrote.

On October 25, they had a webinar about EOC testing and the MSLs (Common Exams). As I listened to it, I tried to type up information as it flew by.

In General

  • The READY Accountability Model is the State Accountability Model. The goal of the READY model is to improve student learning outcomes, raise graduations rates, and close achievement gaps. All testing is to achieve these goals.
  • How will they know that we've met these goals? They will use EOCs, ACTs (the number of students who meet the college readiness standards), graduation rates, math course rigor (the number of students who take and pass Alg. II or Int. Math III), and WorkKeys (for CTE courses - students need silver certificates or better), and the Graduation Project (only marked as a yes - the school has the project or no - the school does not incorporate the project, but it will not measure the success rate of students completing it). These five things will earn up to 100 points. The school's grade will be from 0 to 500. That will in turn be given a letter grade (A, B, C, D, F). They will use EVAAS as well.
  • There is a plan to incorporate student growth in the near future. They will revisit these standards and measures every year by January 15th.
  • There is no advantage for a school to have or not have a Graduation Project.
  • Alternative schools may or may not be graded.

    ENGLISH II EOC
  • The approach to state assessment is no longer is the student proficient, but is the student career and college ready.
  • The test is to be more summative, provide more "Interim Tools," and will look at formative processes everyday.
  • Focus is on the Common Core Standards
  • They gave these web pages to find out more about actual test items:
    www.ncpublicschools.org/acre/assessment/online
    http://thismeeting.wikispaces.com
  • The EOC for English II will have short constructed responses and technology enhanced mulitple choice responses.
  • Scoring rubrics for the short constructed response items will be made available to us.It will be measured 0, 1, or 2.
  • The technology enhanced items will have students moving answers around.

 


What Do the Scores Mean?

This is a draft of what the scores will mean. They will probably not change at all, but if they do, it will be only minor tweaks.

Level 4

Students performing at this level have a superior command of the knowledge and skills contained in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English/language arts as assessed at the end of English II and are academically well prepared to engage successfully in more rigorous studies in this content area. They are on-track to become academically prepared to engage successfully in credit-bearing, first-year English courses or introductory courses requiring college-level reading in a range of disciplines, such as history or the social sciences, without the need for remediation.


Level 3
Students performing at this level have a solid command of the knowledge and skills contained in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English/language arts as assessed at the end of English II and are academically prepared to engage successfully in more rigorous studies in this content area. They are on-track to become academically prepared to engage successfully in credit-bearing, first-year English courses or introductory courses requiring college-level reading in a range of disciplines, such as history or the social sciences, without the need for remediation.


Level 2
Students performing at this level have a partial command of the knowledge and skills contained in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English/language arts as assessed at the end of English II and will likely need academic support to engage successfully in more rigorous studies in this content area. They will likely need continued academic support to become prepared to engage successfully in creditbearing, first-year English courses or introductory courses requiring college-level reading in a range of disciplines, such as history or the social sciences, without the need for remediation.


Level 1
Students performing at this level have a limited command of the knowledge and skills contained in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English/language arts as assessed at the end of English II and will need academic support to engage successfully in more rigorous studies in this content area. They will need continued academic support to become prepared to engage successfully in credit-bearing, firstyear English courses or introductory courses requiring college-level reading in a range of disciplines, such as history or the social sciences, without the need for remediation.

 

 

 

 

 

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Released Forms

 

Online Practice

These are links to practices that can help with the online test, but may not be official NC State EOC released material. They are ranked in order of how close they look to the NC EOC.

 

Paper Practice

These are links to reading comprehension practices that might be useful for classroom practice.

 

Last Minute EOC Tips

 

Constructed Response Practices

 

Lesson Ideas

For this section I'm hoping that some of you will contribute. If you have ideas, worksheets, web sites (yours or someone else's) that will help to teach these concepts, please shoot them to me at marcus.alford@orange.k12.nc.us. I know that we teach these as part of larger units, but it wouldn't hurt to have a few more practices as these tend to show up heavy on the released EOC.

 

Central Idea

  • None yet - be the first!

Author's Purpose

  • None yet - be the first!

Inferences

  • None yet - be the first!

Word Meaning/Context Clues

  • None yet - be the first!

Subplots

  • None yet - be the first!

Overall Structure

  • None yet - be the first!

Other

  • Achieve 3000 - this computer program is a paid program that tracks kids reading levels by their Lexile scores. One of our fellow Beast Slayers (a knight of high ranking) has given her word that it is a program worth the price tag. It uses articles from the AP, so it could even be worked into a nonfiction unit. Plus allows students to work at their own level, so you have differentiation without the fuss. Thanks Tracey!
    *Note* My school was a pilot program for this software this past year and I agree with Tracey - well worth the price tag.
  • Comparing Texts/Rhetorical Devices from eduweb
  • Rhetorical Devices from VA
  • Study Island - They are designing more and more content specific to the different grade level tests in NC.
  • NEW Megan Phillip's EOC Study Plan - Thanks Megan!

 

I got this email and thought I would share it with you guys

The short constructed response items on the English II EOC assessment require a brief response of approximately 3-4 sentences. Although the text box offers additional space to type a short answer response, scorers only review for the specific criteria as stated in the question. Additional information not required in the answer does not increase the student’s score. Short constructed responses are not scored for elaboration, support, or detail. Students should not write an essay for short constructed response items, and they must not be led to believe longer responses may receive higher scores. It is permissible to respond in bullets. The key is to answer the question with the specified supporting evidence.

Teachers should review the short constructed response items and associated rubrics with scoring criteria found in the 2012-13 released forms paper-and-pencil version with answer key for English II and NCEXTEND2 English II at http://www.ncpublicschools.org/accountability/testing/releasedforms to obtain a better understanding of response expectations. The NCDPI recommends schools share the released forms with students before test day. Teachers may wish to specifically address the short constructed response item type and discuss how to respond to these items.

Authors: Hope Lung, Dan Auman

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Other sites in the EOC Underground Network

 

School Net

You have a quick prctice test generator. Log into PowerTeacher like you are going to take attendance, but instead, look to the left and you will see School Net. Click it.

Now find Assessment Admin to the middle right. On the pull down menu click CREATE. The fast instructions are to create an EXPRESS TEST. Just follow the instructions. The test settings default to English, so it's super easy. Pick the number of questions you want and you can either print the test or assign it through their PowerSchool account.

Concepts Used on the Released EOC

When teaching these terms, remember that it is not just identification, it is almost always the effect or purpose of using the term.

Fiction

  • Central Idea
  • Characterization
  • Conflict
  • Connotation/Denotation
  • Dialogue
  • Figurative Language
  • Inference
  • Metaphor
  • Objective Summary
  • Oxymoron
  • Personification
  • Point of View
  • Setting
  • Simile
  • Theme

Non-Fiction

  • Purpose
  • Rhetorical Question
  • Structure (Ex. - Chronological Order, General Overview)

Poetry

  • Couplets
  • Rhyme Scheme
  • Stanza

General

  • Antonyms
  • Synonyms

Other terms that could appear on the exam:

  • alliteration
  • allusion
  • analogy
  • anecdote
  • archetype
  • dialect
  • exaggeration
  • flashback
  • foreshadowing
  • hyperbole
  • imagery
  • irony – dramatic, situational, verbal
  • mood
  • motivation
  • narrative
  • onomatopoeia
  • paradox
  • parallel structure
  • pun
  • refrain
  • repetition
  • soliloquy
  • symbolism
  • tone
  • understatement
  • unreliable narrator

Thanks Brook for this list!

What to Focus on

This information is based on the style of questions on the released form.

  • How/Why/For what purpose does the author do ___
  • Inference/Deeper meaning
  • Literary terms
  • What is the effect of _____
  • Word/Phrase meaning
  • Tone
  • Basic plot information
  • Word replacement
  • Summary

As you can see, there is little basic plot, so please make sure your students are well aware that the seek and find method that might have worked in the past is NOT a good technique for this beast.

Essays

It appears, according to the rubric given for the released test, that these basic elements are looked for in the student's response:

  • Answer the question specifically - if it asks for the theme throughout the poem, stick to one theme that runs throughout the entire poem.
  • Identify the literary term in question - make sure that the student specifically says what that simile or personification is. There is no indication that the definition of the literary term need be given, but it couldn't hurt.
  • Use at least two examples from the text, if possible - test graders love their supporting details.
  • Add analysis- make sure they know this means going beyond summary.

Other things that are not specifically mentioned in the rubric, but certainly could not hurt, would be:

  • Include the title of the work, properly punctuated.
  • Work in the author's name.
  • Look for archetypes - they are easy to manipulate to help explain the point. Symbols can be made to mean anything, as long as there is a good reason behind it.
  • Make a comparison to some other book. Allusions make the writer look smarter because they are looking at this on a larger scale.
  • Have good grammar and spelling. While these are not specifically mentioned in the rubric, mistakes may bias the grader into a lower grade.

According to my source, these short answers are person graded, not computer graded.